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01
Feb
2016

Fun Facts About The Canadian Museum of Human Rights

by CACE February 1st, 2016 | in Latest Articles

The CMHR is the world’s only museum solely dedicated to awareness and education about the importance of human rights for all. It is not based around a collection of artifacts, but designed to illuminate a powerful idea.

  • The first new national museum built in Canada since 1967.
  • Rests on four massive stone “roots” covered with 2,867 metres of green roofs consisting of Prairie tall grass, and is topped by a glowing “Tower of Hope” rising 100 metres above the city (eight metres higher than Ottawa’s Peace Tower).
  • Eleven galleries are housed within a “mountain” of 400 million-year-old limestone, surrounded by a glass “cloud” of 1,300 panes ‐ no two exactly the same. It takes a raindrop about eight minutes to slide from top to bottom of the cloud.
  • Visitors travel through galleries along 800 metres of glowing ramps clad in Spanish alabaster ‐ a literal path of light through the darkness. It takes a fit person about 30 minutes to walk continuously from the main entrance, through all the galleries, to the Tower’s observation deck.
  • Home to 300 objects, artifacts and works of art.
  • Features seven theatres, an immersive multimedia experience, a 360-degree film, and two soundscapes.
  • The first major project in Canada to use virtual reality construction design across all contractor groups.
  • The most inclusive design in Canadian history, setting new Canadian and world standards for universal accessibility, and surpassing Smithsonian standards.
  • The $351-million project is a unique example of private-public collaboration.

CACE Staff


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